Hospitalization for AMI and stroke among those with diabetes have declined significantly since 1988

   Hospitalization rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke among those with diabetes have declined significantly since 1988, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have determined. 

    They estimated the number of hospital discharges having AMI or stroke as first-listed diagnosis among those having diabetes as a secondary diagnosis. They found that the age-adjusted rates for AMI and stroke changed little from 1988 to 1996 and then declined significantly from 1996 to 2009. From 1988 to 2009, the age-adjusted hospitalization rate per 1000 diabetic population declined from 24.7 to 7.7 (average annual percentage change [AAPC] -5.3%) for AMI, and from 18.9 to 9.2 (AAPC -3.9%) for stroke. Similarly, the age-specific rates and the age-adjusted rates by sex and by race for AMI and for stroke showed significant declines throughout the period. 

    "Hospitalization rates for AMI and stroke in the diabetic population have declined," the researchers concluded. "This decline may be due to a number of factors, including a reduction in prevalence of risk factors, new and or more aggressive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, or other factors."